Five ATV Safety Tips

Canada is known for its vast forests and beautiful natural landscapes — all of which can be perfect for taking your ATV out for an adventure. Riders often talk about running into incredible wildlife and getting access to some spectacular views. But every year, riders are involved in tragic accidents with devastating results, including death. Here are some basic safety tips you can follow to ensure your ride is a blast.

Make sure your equipment is up to snuff.

The first key to safety is making sure all your equipment is in good, functional order. We strongly recommend getting a knowledgeable expert to take a look before taking your ATV out on the trails. They will be able to recognize problems before they happen, giving you the assurance that your equipment won’t fail you while you’re out in the woods.

When you’re out there, wear safety gear.

The technology and design behind safety gear has come a long way in the past few years. Now, keeping your body and your noggin safe is more comfortable and more convenient than ever before — meaning there’re no more excuses for taking risks.

Ride where you’re supposed to.

Knowing where you can and cannot ride is a key part of keeping your outing fun. From animal activity to avoiding unseen dangers, trails are often blocked for a reason and you should always obey posted signage. This means that sometimes you might want to do a little research before heading out to make sure you know where you are going.

Also, don’t even think about riding on private property without permission — that’s just not cool.

Take a course.

ATV safety classes are available in most Canadian cities, and don’t take much time. Approved facilities will teach you what you need to know about your equipment, what safety equipment is best and what to do if you get stuck or lost in the woods. And, as the saying goes, knowing is half the battle, right?

Be aware of your surroundings.

Always keep your wits about you. Keep your eyes open and make sure you are able to see everything around you so that you can avoid any obstacles that may appear.

This also means that if you’re the driver, you’re sober. No debate.